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FAQ

Got questions about health insurance in Arizona? Check out our list of FAQs on this very subject.

If you are a resident of Arizona who is approaching age 65, it is important that you thoroughly understand how Medicare insurance works. Many retirees are confused about the timing and requirements for Medicare and don’t know whether they qualify for Medicare supplemental insurance in Arizona

Also known as a “Medigap” policy, Medicare supplemental insurance helps Arizona citizens close the “gaps” in Medicare by providing for deductibles and coinsurance.  However, there are certain time-sensitive purchasing qualifications that exist in Arizona. 

For example, once a Medicare recipient reaches the age of 65 and joins Part B, they can sign up for a Medigap policy within three months of their 65th birthday.  This is known as Medigap open enrollment.  If seniors enroll during this period, they cannot be denied coverage for a pre-existing condition, nor can they be placed on a waiting list.  

A lot has been written about the negative effects of the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, but much of it is politically motivated misinformation. While health care reform laws are far from perfect, they do little to impact the quality and affordability of Medicare. In fact, some Medicare benefits are getting better because of Obamacare.

Healthcare.gov defines open enrollment as "The yearly period when people can enroll in a health insurance plan." This time period typically runs from November to January. Learn what this enrollment period means for you and what you can do if you still need coverage today.

When buying insurance, oftentimes it makes sense to get a plan that covers preventative care rather than picking a plan with a huge premium.

In fact, if you tend to be quite healthy, getting a plan that doesn’t require a co-pay for preventative care can help you to avoid illness or even improve your health, so other services aren’t regularly necessary.

The problem is, it’s hard to define on your own what is considered preventative care. For example, if you get bloodwork because you’re at a new doctor and they want a better idea of your health history, that could be considered preventative, but if you have an illness and the blood work is to diagnose it, that isn’t preventative because you’re visiting the doctor while already ill.

If you don’t ask prior to your appointment and just assume something is preventative, you could end up leaving with a big bill you didn’t expect.

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Thanks so much for getting my health plan done for me.  It was a real surprise after being turned down twice, to finally get approved.  And what a relief!  Thanks again! - D. D. (Tucson)

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